Last month I chatted via phone with a couple of national religion reporters who were trying to make sense of evangelical support (81%) for Donald Trump.  These reporters had been reading things, mostly from progressive sources, that connected Trump evangelicals to the Alt-Right movement, Dominionism, and other forms of Christian nationalism.

These reporters had been reading things, mostly from progressive sources, that connected Trump evangelicals to the Alt-Right movement, Dominionism, and other forms of Christian nationalism.

Our conversations took place right around the time that the Senate was vetting Betsy DeVos, Trump’s Secretary of Education.

They did not seem to capture the lives and views of the evangelicals that they had been encountering in their fieldwork.

I would place Sarah Posner’s recent article at the website of the New Republic among the progressive writing that these reporters were referencing.

As a result, the religious right—which for decades has grounded its political appeal in moral “values” such as “life” and “family” and “religious freedom”—has effectively become a subsidiary of the alt-right, yoked to Trump’s white nationalist agenda.

I don’t dispute the fact that Moral Majority founder Paul Weyrich told Balmer that the Bob Jones segregation case (Green v.

But if one takes a longer look at the rise of the Religious Right, one is hard-pressed to say that race was the only, even primary, factor in its founding.

Wade as the true origins of the…

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